Richard Broom Photography

Photographs, Video and Stuff

Posts from the ‘Ships’ category

The ‘not quite the ticket image…’

Do you ever take a photograph which is terrible, breaks all the rules, and yet you still like it? Here’s an image, shot into sun, badly composed, loads of lens flare, cluttered, lots of grain and probably not entirely in focus but, who cares. There’s no such thing as a bad image!! Maybe this will be the moneymaker!

The 'not quite the ticket image…' - Richard Broom Photography
The ‘not quite the ticket image…’ – Richard Broom Photography

The Doors (or Otter Boards)

These great big lumps of metal are towed behind trawlers. Their aquadynamic shape help to keep the ‘mouth’ of the trawl net open (a bit like wings flying through the water) and the hapless fish are caught in the net, never to escape.

The Doors (or Otter Boards) - Richard Broom Photography
The Doors (or Otter Boards) – Richard Broom Photography
Old fashioned otter boards (image courtesy Wikipedia)

The Lilly Oak on the slip…

The fishing vessel Lilly Oak sits on her cradle on the slip at MacDuff Harbour, Scotland. The slip is a long sloping concrete ramp (image coming soon) used to haul boats out of the water for repair and repainting. The cradle that supports the ships runs on railway lines on the slip.

See a larger version of this image here.

The Lilly Oak on the slip - Richard Broom Photography
The Lilly Oak on the slip – Richard Broom Photography

The Orange Ship

We’ve been living in Banff, Scotland, for just over a week now and the orange ship has been anchored off Banff for all that time. We can’t help wondering why it is there and why it isn’t going anywhere. We watch the ship daily whilst it swings around its anchor as the tide changes. The ship with nowhere to go!

The Orange Ship - Richard Broom Photography
The Orange Ship – Richard Broom Photography

The Tug

Many years ago I worked on deep sea salvage tugs and, since then, I’ve always had a soft spot for tugs. The second image shows the tug Statesman, the first tug I went to sea on in 1972 (this makes me feel VERY old!). The radio callsign of the statesman was 6ZQS (Liberian) but was changed to GSAA when the Statesman became registered in Britain (something to do with the Cod War!). The front of the Statesman looked like one of those expensive ocean-going yachts.

The Tug - Richard Broom Photography
The Tug – Richard Broom Photography
The Statesman
%d bloggers like this: